Read the latest and some hits from the past!
Inside Turkey’s Hagia Sofia

Inside Turkey’s Hagia Sofia

The Hagia Sophia

A True MasterpieceHagia1

If you have never had the opportunity to visit the Hagia Sofia, I certainly recommend you doing so. Turkey’s Hagia Sofia, is a true marvel of the times, and a jewel of the ancients. I would describe it as Turkey’s Taj Mahal, but you wouldn’t guess by looking at it from the outside. That’s right. If you judged the Hagia Sofia by its cover, then you would likely skip the lines and move on to other structures such as the Blue Mosque, which stands only a short distance from Hagia Sofia in a strangely reflective way.Hagia sofia istanbul turkey

The Hagia Sofia was built during that Byzantine Empire. When first built, the structure housed the largest dome in the known world. It was built as a church, and it was not until recently that this was unveiled again.Hagia Sophia Istanbul Turkey

During the Ottoman conquests, the Hagia Sofia was transformed from its Christian manner to an Islamic Mosque. The original walls of the Hagia Sofia were richly enlaced with golden murals of biblical stories and Christian idols to Mary, Joseph, and Jesus. Once the Ottoman’s took over modern-day Turkey, the murals were covered and the Church quickly became a mosque complete with quotes from the Quran on the walls. It was only recently that archaeologists and historians began to uncover the original paintings.Hagia Sofa in Turkey

Today, the Hagia Sofia, is a treasured museum and tribute to both religions. It is a relic of the times, and is magnificently decorated with a unique blend of Islamic and Christian art. Out of the museums and churches that I have been to, I’d say that it was definitely on the top of my list.Hagia13 Hagia12 Hagia11 A Few Hagia Sofia Facts (From source):

  1. The Dome in Hagia Sophia (Sofia) is the second largest in the world. The first is the Patheon in Rome. 
  2. Many of the “Church” features such as bells, relics, and artifacts were removed when it was converted into a mosque.
  3. The building became a museum, when the first Turkish president was elected.
  4. The Blue Mosque, which stands a short distance away, was designed in favor of the Hagia Sophia.
  5. A physicist, mathematician, and scientist first designed the building.
  6. Hagia Sophia played an important role in Eastern Orthodox religion for nearly 1000 years. It served as a church from 537 until 1453.
  7. Sofia (Sophia) means wisdom in ancient Greek.
  8. The full translation of Hagia Sophia is Shrine of the Holy God.
  9. Hagia Sophia is known for its mystical reflecting sunlight through the windows.
  10. You should visit the Hagia Sophia immediately because it is built on a fault line in an earthquake zone. It could be destroyed.

hagia10 hagia9 hagia8 Hagia7 hagia6 Hagia5 Hagia4 hagia3Hagia17 Hagia19 Hagia15

Have you been? What do you think about it?


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

6 comments

  1. Definitely beautiful. Istanbul is an awesome city. Hopefully I’ll get the opportunity to go back before something happens. Didn’t know it was built on a fault line. ah.

  2. Sara @ domes world

    Turkey Architecture are Brilliantly Design and Quality is Very Fine looking Very Precious Art Muslims have God Gifted Hands who prints this kind of words and Arts I`m Student of Arts that`s why i understand well about Art and This city Istanbul have very Rich history behind the Seen,,,

  3. I came across your site while looking for travel inspiration! I’ve been to Istanbul twice, and Haiga Sofia is truly stunning, and I love your description of it as “Turkey’s Taj Mahal”. For me, it’s one of those places where I felt like I was standing on the edge of a civilisation; coming from Europe, Hagia Sofia is like an grand welcome to Asia and the Islamic world, while coming from Asia, it’s like the final farewell from the land of spectacular mosques and temples.
    Tim recently posted…Halal Chinese in Sydney? Hello China Bowl!My Profile

  4. I find pre-Islamic Christian architecture in the Middle East very very interesting. A lot of it is sadly in disrepair, but certainly not the Hagia Sophia. I’m planning a trip to Turkey soon, so thanks for the sneak peek of this famed monument.

  5. I find pre-Islamic Christian architecture in the Middle East very very interesting. A lot of it is sadly in disrepair, but certainly not the Hagia Sophia. I’m planning a trip to Turkey soon, so thanks for the sneak peek of this famed monument.
    Found your website through The Guy’s interview with you–your blog name is quite fun I think. 🙂
    Paper Boat Sailor recently posted…Return to Jaffna: Notes from a Post-war TownMy Profile

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

CommentLuv badge